Fairy-Tales Teaching Trust



 “Thanks to these actions we will gradually change our societies, train them in intercultural dialogue skills and foster  friendly relations towards the neighbours. Our project has a sensitive touch – fairy tale characters are actually we and  it’s amazing how these legends can portray our personalities.”


Bolnisi Language House, a non-government organisation based in Bolnisi, Kvemo Karli, was set up in 2007 with the goal to help ethnic minority communities through language training and cultural programs with the integration process and increase their political and social participation. 

Having partnered with the City Research Center in Armenia, Bolnisi Language House received the EU funding of 54.135 Euro to implement a project named Fairy-Tales Teaching Trust under the Eastern Partnership Territorial Cooperation Support Programme (EaPTC). 

The 12-month project will cover Georgia’s Bolnisi in Kvemo Kartli region and Armenia’s Gyumri in Shirak Region aiming at developing trustworthy atmosphere and intercultural thinking among teenagers and general public living in these regions. “We want to teach kids in Bolnisi the Armenian fairy tales to get them think what kind of characters they have. Similarly, Georgian fairy tales will be taught in Gyumri,” said Irma Zurabashvili, the project’s Head from Georgia.  

Namely, a two-day training course will be organised on fairy tales focusing on cultural specifics of each country in schools of drawing, in Gyumri and Bolnisi, where teenagers will draw fairy tale characters based on their imagination. Afterwards, these paintings will be used to create 10 animations, which will then be broadcast on local TV channels. 

  

On 13-15 November, Bolnisi Language House hosted the first meeting under the project, bringing together work groups from Armenia and Georgia. The Armenian delegation included project’s Head from Armenia Ashot Mirzoyan, an expert in intercultural dialogue Gayane Astoyan and an animation expert Rafael Kotbashyan, among others.  The Georgian group was represented by a psychologist Milena Ananyan, a painter Amiran Isiani and others. “During two days, workshops and discussions were organised on various issues to set up working teams, introduce them to each other and plan future activities,” Zurabashvili said, adding that the seminars focused on explaining intercultural dialogue, while workshops touched upon the future agenda and project’s logo. 

As part of the project, two camps will unite teenagers, which will participate in theatrical performances based on the Armenian and Georgian fairy tales during the ten-day training course.  A Larger audience of parents, relatives, classmates, friends of the participants and visitors of the project website will be invited to the performances. 

Finally, the project’s activities are expected to lead to the establishment of cordial, reliable relations within 20 teenagers and their families. “Thanks to these actions we will gradually change our societies, train them in intercultural dialogue skills and foster friendly relations towards the neighbours,” Zurabashvili believes. Ashot Mirzoyan of City Research Center fully shares her optimism.  “Our project has a sensitive touch – fairy tale characters are actually we and it’s amazing how these legends can portray our personalities,” he said.  


March 22, 2016
Maia Edilashvili
Information Multiplier in Georgia
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